24.5.11

Postcards from Paris: {Osteology: the study of bones}






From the time I can remember, even before I worked there, The Paris Market always had some sort of bone collection, or osteology element. From animal skulls on wooden plaques to the beautiful decoupage skeleton-set by John Derian to our old x-ray machine in the basement that became a monumental fixture. Now I assure you, the store never took on a look of Les Catacombs, but I must admit that in itself would be something which would interest me to no-end. I love the feeling of being completely surrounded by all things "old." So as promised, I share more charms and intrigues from Le Jardin des Plantes. I was even more pleased to discover this addition to the park. The very moment I walked through the doors I knew I would be willing the pay whatever admission was required of me. To heighten my excitement, it was free for me. The ivory-toned bones all reflected the light shining through the ceiling-high windows. The entire color-scheme of the interior is the exact palette I relate to most. Variations of a golden-brown in the parquet floor that creeked when walked across and the calmest shade of blue-grey to compliment against the wood and cream-toned bones. To be honest, I was very much reminded of the store itself, with an exception to our little coffee-bar, there were many elements that I thought would transition well had they been transported across the sea, and found themselves on Broughton street in Savannah. In a non-eerie sense, being there gave me a comfort as if I were back at The Paris Market. Aside from that, each corner had a curiosity to behold: brains and other organs in tall glass jars, diaphragms of animals' anatomy, fossils, whale teeth, and Dinosaur skulls.
Il ├ętait chouette!
Bisous,

5 comments:

ParisMarket&Brocante said...

Reba-I love this!! I have never heard of this place! Now I have a new place to visit on my next trip to Paris. (You know I wanted to be an Archaeologist when I grew up.)
Osteology love,
Paula

Anonymous said...

Cool post. Bones are great - in design school I used them often to get new ideas for the forms things could take - and be moving and functional and interconnected.

Reba Baggett said...

Dear Paula- You will love this place, I just know it. As for being an archaeologist, you still have time. I am certain there are plenty of bones waiting to be discovered and dusted off.
Dear Anonymous- I also remember there being an emphasis on drawing bones in my foundation classes at SCAD. I loved it.
Merci-

Anonymous said...

Salut Reba,
the x-ray machine si sold...but still in the store!
Bisous Isa.

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